Is there anything else hidden in the center of the milk path?

Is there anything else hidden in the center of the milk path?

Milk Way Center

In this image, the stars are seen orbiting a supermassive black hole hidden in the center of the Milky Way, known as Sagittarius A * (Sgr A *). Credit: Global Gemini Spy / NOIRLab / NSF / AURA / J. This Silva / (Space Engine), Confession: M. Zamani (NSF NOIRLab)[2]Accurate views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way

Astronomers use the collaboration of Gemini Intelligence and the International Telescope to shed light on Sagittarius A *.

Obtained with the help of the Gemini Northern Telescope, astronomers have so far measured the movements of stars around stars very accurately.[{” attribute=””>black hole at the center of the

Astronomers have measured the position and velocity of four stars around Sagittarius A * (Sgr A *) more accurately than ever before.[1] A large black hole hidden in the center of the milky way. The motions of these stars – known as S2, S29, S38, and S55 – were found to follow trajectories, indicating that the mass at the center of the Milky Way is almost entirely due to the Sgr A * black hole. Which leaves very little space. what else.

The research team used various astronomical facilities in this study. To measure the velocity of the stars, they used spectroscopy from infrared spectrography (GNIRS) north of Gemini north of Gemini near the Monaco summit in Hawaii, part of the Global Gemini Observatory, the NSF’s NOIRLab program, and SINFONI device. About Southern Europe Observers[{” attribute=””>ډیر لوی ټیلسکوپ. په VLTI کې د GRAVITY وسیله د ستورو موقعیت اندازه کولو لپاره کارول کیده.

بلیک هول سیګیټیریس A

د شیدو لار په مرکز کې د تور سوري Sagittarius A* انځور. کریډیټ: نړیوال جیمیني څارګره/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/J. دا سلوا / (سپیس انجین)، اعتراف: ایم زمانی (د NSF NOIRLab)

“موږ د Gemini Observatory څخه ډیر منندوی یو چې د GNIRS وسیلې موږ ته هغه مهم معلومات راکړل چې موږ ورته اړتیا لرو ،” ریین هارډ ګینزیل وویل ، د ماکس پلانک انسټیټیوټ د بهرنۍ فزیک لپاره رییس او د فزیک په برخه کې د 2020 نوبل جایزې ګټونکی. “دا څیړنه د نړۍ په کچه همکاري په غوره توګه ښیې.”

د شیدو لارې د کهکشان مرکز چې له لمر څخه شاوخوا 27,000 نوري کاله لرې موقعیت لري، د کمپیکٹ راډیو سرچینه Sgr A* لري چې ستورپوهانو د لمر په پرتله 4.3 ملیون ځله لوی لوی لوی تور سوري په توګه پیژندلی. د لسیزو دردناکو مشاهدو سره سره – او د Sgr A* د هویت موندلو لپاره د نوبل جایزه ورکړل شوه[3] – It was difficult to conclude that a large part of this mass belongs only to the supermassive black hole and that it contains large amounts of matter such as stars, small black holes, star dust and gas, or dark matter. Is not

Photographs of stars in the center of the ESO VLTI Milky Way

These illustrated images, obtained with the GRAVITY instrument on the ESO’s largest telescope interferometer (VLTI) between March and July 2021, show the stars orbiting close to Sagittarius A *, the largest in the heart of the Milky Way. Black hole. One of these stars, called S29, has been observed at a distance of about 13 billion kilometers from the black hole, only 90 times the distance between the sun and the earth. Another star called the S300 was first discovered in a new VLTI observation reported by ESO.
Using the Gemini North International Gemini Observer, NSF’s NOIRLab and ESO’s VLT program, astronomers measured the position and speed of these stars S29 and S55 (as well as S2 and S38) more accurately than ever before. Found. Move in such a way that it shows that the mass in the center of the milk path is almost entirely due to the Sagittarius A * black hole, leaving very little space for other things. Credit: ESO / GRAVITY Collaboration

“With the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to confirm that Sgr A * is indeed a black hole, we now want to go further. We want to know if there is anything more hidden in the center of the Milky Way. Is, and whether general relativity is really the correct theory of gravity in this very laboratory, ”explained Stephen Gilsen, one of the astronomers involved in this work. “The simplest way to answer this question is to follow Sgr A * closer to the orbits of the stars.”

Einstein’s general theory of relativity predicts that the orbits of stars around a massive massive compact object are very different from those predicted by classical Newtonian physics. In particular, the general ratio predicts that the orbits of the stars will take on a beautiful pink shape – an effect known as the Schwarzschild precession. In order for the stars to actually find this rose, the team tracked the location and velocity of four stars in the vicinity of Sgr A * – known as S2, S29, S38, and S55. Team observations to the extent that these stars have advanced allow them to predict the mass distribution in Sgr A *. They found that any expanded mass in the orbit of the S2 star contributes to a 0.1% equivalent of a supermassive black hole.


Dynamic layout[{” attribute=””>ESO’s Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) images of stars around the Milky Way’s central black hole. This animation shows the orbits of the stars S29 and S55 as they move close to Sagittarius A* (center), the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. As we follow the stars along in their orbits, we see real images of the region obtained with the GRAVITY instrument on the VLTI in March, May, June and July 2021. In addition to S29 and S55, the images also show two fainter stars, S62 and S300. S300 was detected for the first time in new VLTI observations reported by ESO.

Measuring the minute variations in the orbits of distant stars around our galaxy’s supermassive black hole is incredibly challenging. To make further discoveries, astronomers will have to push the boundaries not only of science but also of engineering. Upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) such as the

“We will improve our sensitivity even further in future, allowing us to track even fainter objects,” concluded Gillessen. “We hope to detect more than we see now, giving us a unique and unambiguous way to measure the rotation of the black hole.”


Zooming in at the heart of the Milky Way to see the stars as observed by the European Southern Observatory by a very large telescope (the last observation is from 2019). Further zooming reveals stars even closer to the black hole that was observed in the middle of 2021 with the GRAVITY instrument at ESO’s largest telescope interferometer.

“Gemini observers continue to offer new insights into the nature of our galaxy and the giant black hole at its center,” said Martin Steele, director of the Gemini program at the National Science Foundation. “Further development of the tool over the next decade aimed at widespread use will keep NOIRLab’s leadership in the universe characteristic of our surroundings.”

For more information on this research, see Star Race Milky Way around the supermassive black hole.

Notes

  1. Sagittarius A * is referred to as “Sagittarius A Star”.
  2. The ESO VLT is made up of four individually colored 8.2-meter binoculars that can combine light through a network of photographs and underground tunnels known as interferometry, forming the VLTI. GRAVITY uses this technique to measure objects in the night sky at a high level[{” attribute=””>accuracy — equivalent to picking out a quarter-dollar coin on the surface of the Moon.
  3. The 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in part to Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez “for the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the center of our galaxy.”

This research is presented in the paper “The mass distribution in the Galactic Centre from interferometric astrometry of multiple stellar orbits” which is published in Astronomy & Astrophysics. A companion paper “Deep Images of the Galactic Center with GRAVITY” has also been published in Astronomy & Astrophysics.

References:

“Mass distribution in the Galactic Center based on interferometric astrometry of multiple stellar orbits” by GRAVITY Collaboration: R. Abuter, N. Aimar, A. Amorim, J. Ball, M. Bauböck, J. P. Berger, H. Bonnet, G. Bourdarot, W. Brandner, V. Cardoso, Y. Clénet, Y. Dallilar, R. Davies, P. T. de Zeeuw, J. Dexter, A. Drescher, F. Eisenhauer, N. M. Förster Schreiber, A. Foschi, P. Garcia, F. Gao, E. Gendron, R. Genzel, S. Gillessen, M. Habibi, X. Haubois, G. Heißel,??, T. Henning, S. Hippler, M. Horrobin, L. Jochum, L. Jocou, A. Kaufer, P. Kervella, S. Lacour, V. Lapeyrère, J.-B. Le Bouquin, P. Léna, D. Lutz, T. Ott, T. Paumard, K. Perraut, G. Perrin, O. Pfuhl, S. Rabien, J. Shangguan, T. Shimizu, S. Scheithauer, J. Stadler, A.W. Stephens, O. Straub, C. Straubmeier, E. Sturm, L. J. Tacconi, K. R. W. Tristram, F. Vincent, S. von Fellenberg, F. Widmann, E. Wieprecht, E. Wiezorrek, J. Woillez, S. Yazici and A. Young, 19 January 2022, Astronomy & Astrophysics.
DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/202142465

“Deep images of the Galactic center with GRAVITY” by GRAVITY Collaboration: R. Abuter, N. Aimar, A. Amorim, P. Arras, M. Bauböck, J. P. Berger, H. Bonnet, W. Brandner, G. Bourdarot, V. Cardoso, Y. Clénet, R. Davies, P. T. de Zeeuw, J. Dexter, Y. Dallilar, A. Drescher, F. Eisenhauer, T. Enßlin, N. M. Förster Schreiber, P. Garcia, F. Gao, E. Gendron, R. Genzel, S. Gillessen, M. Habibi, X. Haubois, G. Heißel, T. Henning, S. Hippler, M. Horrobin, A. Jiménez-Rosales, L. Jochum, L. Jocou, A. Kaufer, P. Kervella, S. Lacour, V. Lapeyrère, J.-B. Le Bouquin, P. Léna, D. Lutz, F. Mang, M. Nowak, T. Ott, T. Paumard, K. Perraut, G. Perrin, O. Pfuhl, S. Rabien, J. Shangguan, T. Shimizu, S. Scheithauer, J. Stadler, O. Straub, C. Straubmeier, E. Sturm, L. J. Tacconi, K. R. W. Tristram, F. Vincent, S. von Fellenberg, I. Waisberg, F. Widmann, E. Wieprecht, E. Wiezorrek, J. Woillez, S. Yazici, A. Young and G. Zins, 19 January 2022, Astronomy & Astrophysics.
DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/202142459

More information

The team behind this result is composed of The GRAVITY Collaboration, R. Abuter (European Southern Observatory), A. Amorim (Universidade de Lisboa and CENTRA – Centro de Astrofísica e Gravitação), M. Bauböck (Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics and University of Illinois), J. P. Berger (University Grenoble Alpes and European Southern Observatory), H. Bonnet (European Southern Observatory), G. Bourdarot (University Grenoble Alpes and Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics), V. Cardoso (CENTRA – Centro de Astrofísica e Gravitação and

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